May 012018
 

Preparing & Preserving Healthy & Delicious Foods

At the upcoming 2018 Good Medicine Confluence 

Good Medicine Confluence Website: www.PlantHealer.org/intro.html

In only two weeks time now, we will be presenting 5 days and nights of fun and education, with over 140 unique classes. 

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6 of these classes will be focused on the considered, ethical gathering and use of wild plant medicines and foods: Wise, informed use of plant medicines is one of the most effective ways to treat illness and contribute to overall  health. It is a mistake, however, to turn to them only  in acute situations, expecting them to bail us out of problems  brought on by an unhealthy lifestyle such as chronic stress, a lack of exercise, or an unhealthy diet.  Herbs work best in synergy with beneficial physical activity and good food. If that food in not only healthful and nutritional, but also delightful, delicious, and satisfying, it additionally contributes to a mental state conducive to healing and overall well-being.  Truly healthy food know longer be looked at as poor tasting, or as a privilege of the elite.  Good home-gardened or purchased ingredients were once the staple of the common people, and along with healing herbs, it is the people’s medicine.

You will be able to participate in the hands-on making of wonderful entrees, and taste your results!

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A big thank you to our teachers Jereme Zimmerman, Erika Larsen, Ginger Webb, Penney Garrett, Susan Evans, and Briana Wiles:

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Food Fermentation: It’s Not What Can I Ferment, It’s What Can’t I Ferment!

with Jereme Zimmerman (1.5 hrs)

Fermenting vegetables through lacto-fermentation (the use of wild yeast and lactic-acid bacteria for preservation and nutritional enhancement) is a healthy, enlivening practice that will help restore the balance of beneficial microbes in your gut and introduce you to a world of new flavors. Fermentation has been the way to preserve food since the Stone Age and has experienced a comeback in the twenty-first century as more and more people become sick (literally and figuratively) of the mass-produced, nutrient-devoid non-foods that pass for sustenance in much of the modern world. Every culture from every corner of the world has its share of fermented-food traditions, as mankind discovered early on that the foods available to them could be both preserved and enhanced with just a little harnessing of nature and its gifts.

In this class you will learn how to ferment myriad garden-grown and wild-foraged vegetables, herbs and other botanicals as a method for preserving the harvest without the use of any modern conveniences. If you’ve got jars, crocks, salt, water and a knife you’re ready to ferment! Zimmerman will initiate the class with his method for making basic sauerkraut, kimchi and pickles, and will then use this blueprint to delve into the vast opportunities in experimentation available to the modern fermenter. If it’s edible, you can likely ferment it. We will discuss the various (non-meat) ingredients possible to ferment in a brine, including peppers, onions and garlic (for fermented hot sauce), mushrooms, corn, and various herbs and wild-foraged plants for enhancing your ferments. Be prepared for a Q&A on what you’d like to ferment, and feel free to bring along something of your own to throw in some brine for a group ferment!

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The Herbal Pantry: Preserving, Enhancing, & Storing

with Susan Evans (2 hrs)

Discover how to preserve the fresh and healthy herbs of summer with elegant blended vinegars, herb butters and spice blends, marinated cheeses, robust herb pestos and spicy salsas. Learn how to harvest and store your herbal bounty for the best flavor. We’ll cover the top seven culinary herbs including basil, oregano, rosemary, thyme, sage, parsley and chives that can be used in a multitude of applications, from culinary to medicinal. Fill up that fridge, freezer and pantry with delicious condiments and seasoning blends to add nutrition and pizazz to any meal.

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Eat Your Herbs: Creative Cooking With Medicinal Plants

with Penney Garrett & Erika Larsen (1.5 hrs)

In this cooking class we will be sharing some building blocks and resources so that you can take your healthy kitchen magic to a whole new level. We’ll go over some foundation techniques for cooking and preserving medicinal herbs such as salts and spice blends, sauerkrauts and pickles, mead, oxymel, vinegar and kombucha, soups and stocks, crackers and energy bars.  We’ll talk about formulating a meal like you do a tincture.  And about ways that cooking can be an important medium for working with herbs in community: for yourself, your family, your friends, people that you’re around and cooking for on a regular basis.  Then we’ll all do some cooking!  And eating!  We’ll bring some samples of foods that take longer to make, and as a class make a meal to share.  We’ll also share some of our favorite resources: the books we double check for ratios, the web sites we check for inspiration. Please bring your questions, and come ready to play and eat.

For both of us the line between food and medicine is blurry.  Many tonic herbs are foods.  Many spices are medicine.  And foods are medicines too: for protection, for improved immune function, for re-building broken down muscles, tendons.  Food is medicine.  Medicines can be food.  Maybe we don’t need to be so stringent in our categorization.  The kitchen is a place to experiment, to use what you have on hand, to create, share, love and heal.  Which is what we’d love to do with this class.  Let’s talk, cook, and eat together.

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Wild Foods & Medicine of The Mountains – Culinary & Healing Delights

with Briana Wiles (1.5 hrs)

In this hands on lab we will take the aromatics from nature and turn them into delicious concoctions for medicine making or cooking. Learn ways to prepare alcohols, honeys, vinegars, oils, and more with wild plants from the Rocky Mountains. You may think its always medicine making we herbalists are after when going out for plants, but a large majority of us have started to incorporate wild foods and herbs into our diets. Not only do we have cupboard–or room– apothecaries anymore, now we’ve moved onto chest freezers and pantries. This exploratory class will have fresh plants to chop up, tasty samples, and maybe a jar of something you made in class. Learn to blend the flavors of the wild into an array of things from cocktails, salad dressings, spice blends, tea blends, rubs, marinades, tinctures, oxymels and so much more, the mind could be as creative as ever. We will talk about fresh plants, dried plants, seeds, roots, flowers, and fruits to infuse, garnish and create a vibrantly wild culinary or medicinal delight.

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Hands-On Lab: Supermarket Botany Bingo

with Ginger Webb (1.5 hrs)

Botanical plant families can be incredibly useful to herbalists and herbal students as a starting point to learning about plants.  I love using the plants available in the produce aisle, bulk department, and spice aisle of the grocery store or supermarket to begin this conversation about plant families with my students.

In this fun class, you will get a chance to play (and perhaps win!) Supermarket Botany Bingo. Come learn or get a refresher course in the plant families found in our daily lives. As we play, I will share with you how I use the framework of the plant families, whether I am an in the apothecary or in the field, to think about and deepen my understanding of plant medicines.

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Sunday Hands-On Workshop Intensive:

Home Fermentation: Sauerkraut & Beyond

with Penney Garrett (2.5 hrs)

Are you tired of paying $9 for a small jar of fancy kimchi at the store, but simply can’t live without it? Have you wanted to make sauerkraut or pickles but feel like it’s a daunting task? Come to this class to learn how surprisingly simple making these things for yourself can be. We will talk about how amazing our bacterial partners are, and taste some fun flavor combinations that go way beyond the typical. Much of this can seem scary and intimidating from the outside, but every documented culture has recorded methods of fermentation – implemented long before fancy kitchen gadgets and scary safety warnings. From a way to preserve the bounty of the year, to bringing a bit of intoxication and magic to ceremonies, ritual, and celebration, fermentation can be a truly magical addition to any meal or event.

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For all 140 class descriptions and 70 teacher bios – or to purchase Online Discount Tickets – click on:

Good Medicine Confluence Website: www.PlantHealer.org/intro.html

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(Please Share & Repost, Thank You!)

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